Dave in a Cave: 3000 year-old lessons on trust amid isolation from Psalm 57

 

Dave in a Cave: 3000 year-old lessons on trust amid isolation from Psalm 57

In the movie The Terminal- Tom Hanks portrays a man who is stuck in an airport terminal indefinitely due to a series of comical misfortunes. There is a revolution in his country and his passport is revoked mid-flight- rendering him unable to enter the United States or to go back home. Probably a great movie for us to find solace in today! Actually, a great movie all around for anytime, and one of my favorites. Incredibly enough- it is actually loosely based on a true story. Crazy stuff happens. During the movie we get to know a cast of characters that work in the airport that we’d typically overlook. The cleaning crew, bureaucrats working the desks, TSA agents, and other misfits. One of my favorites is the custodian. For fun, he will often make a spill in the middle of the terminal, place warning cones all around it, and watch as people slip and slide all over the tile because they’ve failed to heed the warning signs. Its all in good fun and no one gets hurt- though in real life things may not go as “smoothly”. I’ve been wracking my brain for examples of how important it is for us to learn from the examples of others, and this story seems to be the best I can do. When we slow down a bit and watch other people to learn from their successes and failures, we can learn quite a bit!This Sunday we are going to be looking at a psalm that strangely parallels our own circumstances today. One of the most intriguing parts about psalms is that none of them were written in a vacuum. Some we know much about- such as the author, timing, circumstances surrounding the psalm, and details about how the psalm was to be sung in the temple. Others leave us to wonder about all of these things. If we pay attention to the superscriptions that accompany the psalms- we see that there are two that King David wrote from a cave: 57 and 142. 57 was written at a time in King David’s life, before he was king. He was actually being chased by King Saul, who was trying to kill him. Alone, hunted down, and a wanted man, he took refuge in a cave. He couldn’t show his face for fear that he would be killed- so he had to isolate from others and do his best to survive. And if we thought we had it tough today- we need only to try to imagine what it would be like to have to hide from someone who was trying to assassinate us.We can learn much from these psalms for immediate application in our own time. In these prayers to God, David is honest about his predicament, and yet remains steadfast in trusting the Lord through his trials. We will look at four specific ways that David places his trust in God. This is an encouraging 3000 year old message from the pen of a man in isolation that ministers to our hearts today.I hope you are able to tune in. God bless you. Have a great weekend, stay safe, and I hope to see you in the chat box Sunday!-Pastor Nathan Rice

Posted by Christ Community Church on Friday, April 17, 2020

In the movie The Terminal- Tom Hanks portrays a man who is stuck in an airport terminal indefinitely due to a series of comical misfortunes. There is a revolution in his country and his passport is revoked mid-flight- rendering him unable to enter the United States or to go back home. Probably a great movie for us to find solace in today! Actually, a great movie all around for anytime, and one of my favorites. Incredibly enough- it is actually loosely based on a true story. Crazy stuff happens. During the movie we get to know a cast of characters that work in the airport that we’d typically overlook. The cleaning crew, bureaucrats working the desks, TSA agents, and other misfits. One of my favorites is the custodian. For fun, he will often make a spill in the middle of the terminal, place warning cones all around it, and watch as people slip and slide all over the tile because they’ve failed to heed the warning signs. Its all in good fun and no one gets hurt- though in real life things may not go as “smoothly”. I’ve been wracking my brain for examples of how important it is for us to learn from the examples of others, and this story seems to be the best I can do. When we slow down a bit and watch other people to learn from their successes and failures, we can learn quite a bit!

This Sunday we are going to be looking at a psalm that strangely parallels our own circumstances today. One of the most intriguing parts about psalms is that none of them were written in a vacuum. Some we know much about- such as the author, timing, circumstances surrounding the psalm, and details about how the psalm was to be sung in the temple. Others leave us to wonder about all of these things. If we pay attention to the superscriptions that accompany the psalms- we see that there are two that King David wrote from a cave: 57 and 142. 57 was written at a time in King David’s life, before he was king. He was actually being chased by King Saul, who was trying to kill him. Alone, hunted down, and a wanted man, he took refuge in a cave. He couldn’t show his face for fear that he would be killed- so he had to isolate from others and do his best to survive. And if we thought we had it tough today- we need only to try to imagine what it would be like to have to hide from someone who was trying to assassinate us.

We can learn much from these psalms for immediate application in our own time. In these prayers to God, David is honest about his predicament, and yet remains steadfast in trusting the Lord through his trials. We will look at four specific ways that David places his trust in God. This is an encouraging 3000 year old message from the pen of a man in isolation that ministers to our hearts today.

I hope you are able to tune in. God bless you. Have a great weekend, stay safe, and I hope to see you in the chat box Sunday!

-Pastor Nathan Rice

 

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